Tube TalkVideo Marketing

Making Effective Ads with Travis Chambers – TubeTalk 147

By September 14, 2017 No Comments

Travis Chambers is one of the top experts on creating persuasive and sharable sales videos. He recently produced the Nerd Skincare campaign that has gotten millions of views and put the company on a whole new trajectory.

Some quick takeaways include:

  1. Large Fortune 500 companies do branding videos and many smaller companies try to emulate that, when the really need to be selling something.
  2. Nothing compares with video when it comes to earning people’s loyalty.
  3. Good video uses the same techniques as talented product vendors in Costco and the like.

Follow Travis on Twitter @travis_chambers.

While you’re at it, subscribe to Vidpow’s YouTube channel for more awesome tips!

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Transcript:

Jeremy Vest:  
Hey everybody, this is Jeremy Vest with vidpow.com. Today I have the one, the only, Travis Chambers. How is it going, man?

Travis Chambers: 
Good. How are you doing?

Jeremy:                        
I’m doing well. Doing well. Travis, you’re one of my favorite video marketers. You’ve created some of my favorite ads, actually, of all time on YouTube, which is a pretty big deal. I wanted to ask you about what’s some of your favorite ads you guys have made?

Travis:
Well, the nerve skincare ad was cool because we were kind of wading into that direct response world with that format of the four or five minute video where you’re hard selling for majority of it. We hadn’t done a ton of them before that, and when that blew up and got 23 million views and did a few million in sales, that was really exciting because we were suffering major imposter syndrome when we did that video. Even the company had barely done any sales when we launched, so there was very little infrastructure, very little brand. It was like all the pieces were missing to be successful, and it still was. I think that’s probably why that’s my favorite project is there was just so much luck and we still didn’t know exactly what we were doing. For it to do that well was really cool.

Jeremy: 
Yeah, it’s really awesome. What’s another project you guys worked on?

Travis:  
Probably my next favorite project is that we’ve done for PiperWai, which is a Shark Tank company that has a natural deodorant. I like that one a lot because after doing these huge production shoots, we decided like, “Hey, let’s spend a little more time on the message and the selling, and let’s spend a little bit less time on just trying to go massive with these productions.” And it worked. We went a little bit lower production as far as sets and stuff like that goes, and it still did really well. What was cool about it was we saw lift in retail and on Amazon, which was really exciting and we’ve learned so much about those tertiary sales that come, which has really been cool.

Jeremy:    
It’s really interesting, I’ve dabbled a little bit … you saw the [inaudible 00:02:51] grad we did and we’ve been dabbling in selling with video. The biggest misconception I had was people are going to just see your video and go purchase. What I realized really quickly is that’s actually a misconception. The real way it tends to happen is people then visit the website or you re-market them and then 27 ads later they click a link and you go into that funnel and you become this assisted conversion because of the video was the entry point. Do a lot of your customers … is it the same way? They don’t just go purchase immediately.

Travis:  
Yeah, sometimes it is. I loved your hyper-ex video, by the way. That was like mega-high octane stuff. It was awesome. Yeah. So, it’s interesting, man. Majority of the time it’s exactly what you explained. It’s a sales funnel. The video is just getting people way more qualified than anything else ever could, more than a press feature or a celebrity endorsement. I mean, maybe the only thing strong would be word-of-mouth, friend referral. But it qualifies people, and so everything goes up with these videos. Your conversion rates on your website goes up. Your average order value goes up. Your percentage of repeat customers goes up. It has this big impact across the board, even like when you said, even if it’s not immediate video to sale.

Jeremy: 
Travis, I wanted to ask you … What I really want to talk about today is why video? Why does it work? Obviously, it’s a picture is worth a thousand words with the video worth. We kind of get that video is important, but I think there’s a lot of misconceptions about what selling with video is. I want to get out of you is what’s that next ceiling? How can we use video to grow our brands and sell stuff? I’m just going to let you riff because, Travis, in my opinion, you’re definitely one of the top people in the world that do this. Just lay it on us, man. What are those things that’s going to take to get successful selling something with the video?

Travis:    
It honestly takes being unexpected. As you know, Jeremy, we used to do viral video and we got a lot of flack from it from like everybody. Everyone’s like, “You say you do viral video, but no one does viral video.” After a while, we started listening to people because it got really hard. That’s where we started focusing on sales.

I think there’s two sections of how companies should be using video. You have your Fortune 500, Fortune 1000 brands, and they have to be focused on branded video. For them, it’s all about this piece of content over here and this piece of content over here and growing audience. That’s like what you’ve done tons with, Jeremy, with growing audiences and stuff. You know that game.

And then there’s all the other companies that aren’t Fortune 1000 that really need all that same stuff. They also just need to sell. I think a lot of those companies sometimes try to act like their Coca-Cola. They think that they should go out and shoot all of these entertaining, feel-good videos. Maybe they’re inspiring or they’re shareable or whatever, which is great, but they really should be selling, as well. I think that’s probably one of the most common things I see, and I think these companies to have a really hard time figuring out what to do with video because they either are doing this really low budget thing that’s not making much of an impact other than maybe growing some audience. They don’t really know what to do. They know they need to do video and they maybe hire some videographers that make some cute little pieces that are cool and represent the brand well, but there’s sometimes not a lot of realization on what kind of video really should be being made. I imagine you probably see that a lot, too, right, Jeremy?

Jeremy:       
Yeah, absolutely. In my opinion, every single video is a sales video because your brand is being represented. A how-to video, how to fix something, if you sell that product. Or a why-to video, you’re a thought leader and people are going to go back to your website. Every single video, in my opinion, is a sales video.

One thing we’re doing a lot more of is we call viral videos sharable videos because we want people to share them for sales, whatever. But we’re doing a lot of hardcore, old-school product videos specifically for buyers. For example, we work with a company called Bayco where we do high-end flashlights for police officers and all kinds of firefighters and things like that. We’re actually making videos specifically for those people like in the fire department that are making the purchases for 10,000 flashlights. We’re doing very micro product videos now that have nothing to do with the sales formula, make people laugh, cry, all that type of stuff. We’re finding a lot of success in just other types of sales videos. I think that’s what’s beautiful about what you do for a living is I think you can just go down 5,000 rabbit holes to help people sell stuff.

One question I have for you, Travis, is why does video work online better than any other online platform in the history of the world?

Travis: 
It can’t be compared. It’s incomparable to anything. Video is audio-visual. Most companies put most of their resources into static image ads, copyrighting, blog articles, stuff like that, which is powerful, but it’s not powerful as video. When someone spends, three, four or five minutes with your brand, if that video’s fully-optimized, it’s fast-paced, if it’s entertaining, educating, there’s nothing that compares with that.

Here’s the analogy I use a lot, selling, as you know, Jeremy, you probably agree with this … Online video is really just the modern version of selling that’s happened for thousands of years in every vegetable/fruit market since the history of mankind. Think about it that way, when you walk into Costco and you walk past this guy who’s selling knives or pots and pans or some new salsa maker, somehow that never goes away. I think those guys have been around ever since I was a kid. I can remember it.

But you have the guys that are sitting there and they’re just giving you information and you just pass right by them. Then you have the guy who has a personality and he has character and he’s flipping the pots and pans around. He’s making jokes with the lady in the audience and he has this personality that you can’t ignore. And then, all of a sudden, you’re standing there and you realize you’ve been watching this guy for 10 minutes and you’re like, “What am I doing? I don’t even want pots and pans, but I’m so engaged with this guy’s personality that I’m actually considering buying this.” That’s really what video is. Video is the super talented, animated guy selling pots and pans in Costco that you just can’t ignore.

Jeremy:        
He’s the ShamWow guy.

Travis: 
It makes an impact. In video, too, it’s just like everyone’s in a sea of ads. I can’t remember the statistic. I read once that the average person in LA sees over 400 or 500 ads a day. We just tune everything out and video is a way that’s more powerful than anything to get people’s attention if it’s done right. It’s a way to stand out among other brands, and it goes even deeper than the human element, it goes into the algorithm element. Facebook gives more reach and more engagement to video, because video keeps people on Facebook longer. At the end of the day, that’s really all Facebook cares about is keeping people on their website longer. If your video is good, it has a long watch time, then they’re going to give your video more reach. You have the human side, but then you also have the algorithm, the technology side, that has these huge benefits, as well.

Jeremy:   
Yeah, absolutely. Travis, when you’re selling YouTube versus Facebook, what percentage of sales happen actually from a Facebook ad versus a YouTube ad?

Travis:
For us right now it’s probably about 70% Facebook and 30% YouTube. We have a couple products that are more male-facing that it’s pretty split between Facebook and YouTube. Usually our biggest challenge with YouTube is scaling. We’ll get to $3,000 or $4,000 a day, and then we have a hard time maintaining good CPAs above that. Whereas, Facebook it seems like we can go a lot higher and do $7,000-$8,000 a day and maintain CPAs someone. But on our female-facing products, it skews heavily, heavily Facebook. I don’t know-

Jeremy:
Yeah, we found 80-90% Facebook.

Travis:    
Same.

Jeremy:
Yup.

Travis: 
Yeah. I don’t know what it is. I feel like maybe Facebook just … I think it’s maybe a little bit broader use by people, and I think it maybe is used … I know that Facebook actually is the only social platform or network that skews male. It’s 51-52% male, but we also know that women buy 80% of the stuff.

Jeremy: 
Yeah, they do.

Travis:  
They’re the ones you want to really talk to most of the time.

Jeremy:
Hey, Travis, any closing thoughts of if there’s a brand out there listening to you, give them … what’s your final thought on what you should do, how you should stand out to actually sell and grow your business with video?

Travis: 
If you’re a company and you’re listening to this right now, and you’re doing social ads, odds are that you may have reached a plateau. You may be spending $1,000 a day or maybe even $2,000 a day, or maybe even less, and every time you bump it up your cost for acquisition goes way up and makes it so that it’s not worth doing it. You have to stay small and you feel like maybe you’re targeting a lot of people who are coming to your website from organic sources, and you maybe feel like you’re a little capped. If that’s true, make a high-production video. Make a high-production video that’s very difficult for people to ignore.

Jeremy:     
All right, Travis. Any final thoughts for any brands out there? How should they start selling with video?

Travis: 
There’s a chance that a lot of people listening to this have maybe hit a plateau in the ad spend. Maybe they’re using a lot of image assets, maybe they have some video that they’re using, maybe you’re stuck at $500 a day or $1,000 a day and really have a hard time scaling and keeping your cost for acquisition where you want it. If that’s true, let’s make a high-production video. Make something that is fast-paced, that’s engaging, that’s sharable, that’s relatable, and that is selling really hard. And make it long because the longer people watch the video, if it’s good, the more reach that the algorithms are going to give you. What will happen is … I can tell you, we’ve seen it on every client we’ve worked with … is it’s going to raise the feeling on your social ad spend, on what you can do. We’ve seen clients be stuck at that $1,000-$1,500 mark, and we make one of these videos and we’re able to get to $5,000, $6,000, $7,000 a day with a good ROI, if not better than what they had before. It’s crazy.

We have a client right now. They had a 35% reorder rate, which is really high. Since launch, their reorder rate is over 65%, which is like unheard of. The conversion rate on their website has doubled and their average purchase value has gone up by about 30%. There are these …

Jeremy: 
Wow, that’s unreal.

Travis: 
There’s an impact when you spend three or five minutes with somebody. There’s impacts across the board. That’s, I guess, my parting thought.

Jeremy:  
Awesome. Travis, what’s your company and how can people reach you?

Travis:
We’re Chamber media. Our website is www.chamber.media. I’m on LinkedIn, Travis Chambers, and also on Twitter, @Travis_Chambers.

Jeremy:
Great. You can find us at vidpow.com and until next time keep talking tube.